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Ron Goebel and Nancy Andrews have produced two documentaries and published two books about Mata Ortiz pottery. Also we lived in Mata Ortiz for a year. Our friendships with the local people span twenty years.

The Storm, the Protesters, and the Would-be Purge

The Storm, the Protesters, and the Would-be Purge
(The purge never happened. But a more authentic history emerged.)

The following thoughts were originally published by Joseph Wilder, Editor, Journal of the Southwest, Volume 56, Number 4, Winter 2014, and were written about what he regarded as Jim Hills’s “landmark” perspectives on the history of Mata Ortiz. Wilder is responding here to what he calls “orchestrated” criticisms of the groundbreaking work.

Per Joseph Wilder:
The Journal of the Southwest (54, 1, Spring, 2012) published a special issue on the pottery-making traditions of Mata Ortiz, Chihuahua, Mexico. “Forgotten Tributaries of the Palanganas: Untold Stories from Mata Ortiz” was edited by Jim Hills , and included articles across a broad spectrum of Mata Ortiz life and production, including interviews with potters, photo essays, discussion of the social life of the village, analyses of art and craft practiced over decades. It was a landmark issue on a significant place and its meaning. Central to the issue was a section dedicated to “New Perspectives” on the phenomenon of Mata Ortiz, and at the heart of that section was Jim Hills’ 78-page essay, “Reconstructing a Miracle: New Perspectives on Mata Ortiz Pottery Making.” Publication of this article ignited a storm. A group of American residents of Mata Ortiz or Americans with deep personal and professional ties to the village and its craft production made their displeasure with Hills’ revisionist history and the beginnings of modern Mata Ortiz pottery-making plain. Besides email and letters to me personally, as editor of the journal, there was an orchestrated letter campaign to various officials at the University of Arizona, our academic home, including to our college dean and the president of the University. There were also, I hasten to add, positive – indeed, glowing – reviews and responses sent to me. I responded at length to a number of the protestors, who often called for us to retract the publication (after admonishing us that the publication should not have been published at all, despite normal peer review); usually the critical letters focused on the putative lack of objectivity in Hills’ piece, and this was something I took particular pains to address. I quote from one of my responses:
“Jim’s piece makes real claims – but he does not claim to have spoken the final word; instead, as his publisher, Jim’s effort opens a conversation and it is a powerful opening that is the essence of scholarship. You state a concern with “objectivity”, implying that this issue (and Jim’s essay in particular) fail on that score. Again, while you do not support this charge, you also do not specify what “objective” might mean in this case. The term, of course, is loaded, and there exist literally shelves of materials accumulated over the last 150 years of social science research contesting, analyzing, and plain worrying about that concept. A useful way to think about “objectivity” in human affairs (as opposed to observing molecules through a microscope) is to think in terms of transparency, openness, and intersubjectivity and to remember that in human sciences the “theorist” is a part of that which he theorizes: we do not stand outside of the history we seek to understand; rather we of necessity inform and belong to that history – such are our limitations, and Jim Hills never transgresses those limitations – indeed he respects them, as do I and as does Journal of the Southwest.”
The key of course is the notion of dialogue or conversation. In another correspondence I wrote:
“Jim has written a new narrative history of aspects of Mata Ortiz. He, admittedly, does not pull punches, nor should he. It counters a prevailing, dominant narrative that has held sway for several decades. No doubt this version may be challenged – and further developed – especially since it seems that Jim’s essay has broken through an insularity that is a working danger of small communities of knowledge – and this is a good thing. Ultimately it will be nice to hear the voices – directly – of the Mexicans themselves and how they might construct the narration of their recent history. All of this is the normal intellectual development of the history of time and place, and it shocks me that it seems to be unacceptable to some. It goes without saying – or should – that the way to respond to new narratives to which you might disagree is with your own carefully researched, thought out article – that is reviewed, refereed, and published in the scholarly literature. Indeed, in all of the social sciences, this is exactly the way scholarship proceeds. We are not publishing coffee table books – nor are we publishing magazines or op ed newspapers. We are the arena for academic, scholarly engagement, in all its messy glory. There is a lovely concept of Hegel’s about history – the loving struggle of opposites – the “agon” or agony that provides continually renewed, provisional “truths” of history. This is at bottom what the intellectual enterprise is about: we challenge reigning paradigms, we challenge ourselves and our complacency, we risk ourselves in the marketplace of ideas, and out of that struggle do emerge hard-won truths that imperfectly begin to describe the world we live in and create. My job as an academic publisher is to reflect that struggle and to provide the means for it to occur.”

MIMBRES/MATA ORTIZ/CASAS GRANDES

ENGLISH/SPANISH

These are two contemporary Mata Ortiz pots with Mimbres influence. First pot is from Luis Rodriguez and second is by Gerardo Pedregón. Luis 006Photos All 003A Mata Photo

About the Mimbres:  Per Dr. Cynthia Bettison, director of Western New Mexico Museum in Silver City, New Mexico, “There are Mimbres sites in Mexico.” “The Tarahumara are direct descendents of the Mimbres.”

Mata Ortiz designs are inspired by Casas Grandes ceramics. Also, there is influence from the Mimbres.

 

Estas son dos ollas contemporáneas de Mata Ortiz con influencia de Mimbres. El primer bote es de Luis Rodríguez y el segundo es de Gerardo Pedregón. (No para la venta)

Según la Dra. Cynthia Bettison, directora del Museo del Oeste de Nuevo México en Silver City, Nuevo México, “Hay sitios de Mimbres en México”. “Los tarahumaras son descendientes directos de los Mimbres”.

Los diseños de Mata Ortiz están inspirados en la cerámica de Casas Grandes. Además, hay influencia de los Mimbres.

Professor Julian Hernandez, Paquime

Julian Hernandez is a professor and professional potter, specializing in traditional pre-Hispanic Casas Grandes-style pots. He lives in Nuevo Casas Grandes.

 

Efforts Made to Rescue the Ceramics of Paquimé

By Julián Alejandro Hernández Chávez, 2013, translated from Spanish

Background information

During the pre-Hispanic period, the Paquimé culture can be considered the most important in northern Mexico outside of the Mesoamerican area. It was located in northwestern Chihuahua and presently covers approximately eight municipalities reaching the border at the northeastern part of the state of Sonora.

This culture flourished approximately from 700 to 1500 AD. Presently, in this region, there are about two thousand archaeological sites. Most of them have not been studied. In some isolated cases, foreign academics have carried out research, as is the case of the City of Paquimé investigated by the Amerind Foundation of Arizona, U.S.A. represented by Charles C. Di Peso. Eduardo Contreras Sánchez was the INAH representative on Mexico’s behalf. They carried out extraordinary field work between 1958 and 1961 and worked on the project another 15 years by publishing a unique collection of archaeological works written by specialists in related fields. The first three volumes are devoted to general knowledge of the Paquimé culture; volumes four to eight are reference works for archaeologists, anthropologists, historians and specialists in the field.

In the mid seventies, research of Paquimé in Mexico practically came to a standstill but it continued steadily in the U.S. where various groups of archaeologists from several universities carried out studies during different periods. They slowly enriched the documentary archives about this great culture.

One aspect that was studied was the pottery; it gives us information about the people who made it, the artists’ and artisans’ magical abilities and about the people who lived in the region during that era. Paquimé ceramics are unique; they are a representation of the ancient inhabitants of Chihuahua and contribute to the knowledge of the development of its inhabitants through time and help to place this culture within a larger regional context.

Today, a new kind of artistic expression has appeared almost spontaneously in the region. It is the production of low temperature ceramics inspired by the old pieces created by the ancient culture. In a relatively short time, about thirty years, it has come to occupy a space in popular art; a space that had been the exclusive domain of the great artisan masters and artists from the traditional ceramic production centers that had been in business for two or three hundred years. The new Paquimé ceramics that are made using traditional methods similar to the ancient ones are gaining ground, especially those made in the town of Juan Mata Ortiz in the municipality of Casas Grandes which have been recognized at national and international levels. These artists and artisans have brought many benefits to the communities where these ceramics are made.

My entry to the world of Paquimé ceramics dates from 1972 when I met the archaeologist Eduardo Contreras Sánchez who had been the INAH representative during the great exploration between 1958 and 1961. At that time, he was responsible for the Paquimé project and we became good friends. I collaborated with him in different ways, from supporting his investigative efforts and dealings with the authorities for the conservation of the archaeological zone and the protection of the sites against vandalism and sacking of which they have always been victims, in some cases due to ignorance and in others due to ambition. These have slowly destroyed the historic legacy of what is the oldest known social grouping in Chihuahua as well as the most important pre-Hispanic culture in northern Mexico and North America during the XIII and XIV centuries. Knowing more about the ancient inhabitants of Chihuahua, the land where I was born, filled me with pride and a sense of belonging to that land. Something that caused a strong impression on me was the pottery at the archaeological sites that although it had been abandoned and subject to the weather for more than 700 years, had not lost the intensity of its colors. Its unique designs called my attention because they contained information that had not been deciphered and that still holds the secrets of those people in each pot and each decorated piece found among the funerary offerings.

I read the material published about Paquimé, almost all the material was in English and there was little in Spanish. I concentrated on the pottery as the cornerstone to understand their cultural development through time and to help us conserve this legacy. I had the opportunity of drawing up the archaeological map of northwestern Chihuahua where we identified almost two thousand sites in a region that is presently occupied by approximately ten municipalities. One hundred and fifty kilometers from the Sierra Madre to the municipality of Villa Ahumada and the municipality of Madera to the border with the State of New Mexico in the U.S. some 200 km to the north. According to some researchers, this region was the seat of the Paquimé or Casas Grandes culture.

The great efforts made by Contreras did not receive support from the federal or state governments, much less from the municipalities. It is a constant that culture has the last priority in our officials’ and politicians’ plans. Contreras fell gravely ill in 1986 in Casas Grandes after several seasons of working there and died that same year in Mexico City. This called the attention to the northern region of the academic community, as well as that of the governments. Much like the medieval knight, “el Mío Cid”, he won his last battle after death. Paquimé appeared on Mexico’s cultural horizon and an unprecedented amount attention of the federation was given to the archaeological zone which provided more resources, more guards and more frequent working seasons sponsored by the Federal government. In this way, the archaeological investigation horizons in the whole state of Chihuahua became greater. As a result, a unit of the National School of Anthropology and History was established in Chihuahua City and the Paquimé culture began to be included in primary school textbooks.

Archaeologists from universities in the U.S., Canada and other countries came to Casas Grandes and I became good friends with Michael Whalen, Paul Minnis from the University of Tulsa and Oklahoma, Todd Pietzel from the University of Arizona, together, in 1985, they started annual projects and every year, they have brought students of all levels, BAs, MBAs and PhDs who have published a dozen books related to Paquimé in addition to more than a hundred scientific articles published in magazines that specialize in Arid-American archaeology. In fact, they have continuously, as a group and individually, kept studying the Paquimé culture following Di Peso’s and Contreras’ works with scientific exactitude. I have accompanied them to visit about 480 sites in the region, always specifically concerned with learning more about the pottery; although my specialty is not archaeology, I have learned much in these 27 years of working with them, some of their publications have been dedicated to me for which I am grateful and continue to participate in their work; their warehouse in Mexico is part of my house.

On our part, at the end of the century, at Casas Grandes we were fighting for our dream: to build an onsite museum at Paquimé which we finally achieved after nearly 10 years of negotiations. In 1998, the Museum of Northern Cultures and the Paquimé Culture was inaugurated after innumerable attempts; it was declared by UNESCO to be Cultural Heritage of Humanity as a unique culture with its own characteristics, in addition to the earthen architecture and the other unique aspects of the desert cultures. One of its most expressive manifestations is its pottery which has become Paquimé’s marker of identity.

In 1952, in Casas Grandes, Manuel Olivas began to produce low temperature ceramics decorated with the designs from the pieces found at the archaeological sites. His grandmother taught him how to find the clay deposits, how to prepare the clay and fire his pieces the way his family did to produce clay articles. This is how the new traditional Paquimé ceramics were born; after this, the ceramics appeared spontaneously in several communities in the region and the new potters exchanged the information they had. They sold their pieces as utilitarian and decorative objects, first to locals and later to tourists.

When Eduardo Contreras died, to honor his memory, I wrote a notebook titled: “Let’s Conserve Paquimé” to call the attention of the authorities and people who lived in the region to the fact that the archaeological sites needed to be protected because they were still being sacked. With the help of my students, we printed it at the “Francisco Villa” school. It had more than 50 illustrations and since in those days, INAH charged 400 pesos for the rights to each photo, we printed it on a mimeograph and instead of photos we illustrated it with some excellent drawings made by Gustavo Rubio. The first edition was 4000 copies which we distributed in the region and wherever we could. Later, in Colorado it was printed a second time, 2000 copies in both English and Spanish, the notebook practically became a guide to visit the archaeological zone. We only needed to complete it by adding photos to the drawings in spaces left for that purpose which made the visit to Paquimé more attractive.

At that time I was contacting persons who were beginning to work with ceramics and I remember that my first contacts were Andrés Villalba, Juan Quezada, Héctor Gallegos, Armando Rodríguez and a few others with whom I first began to work with clay. At the beginning of the nineties I began a new adventure in the arts by establishing the first formal workshop for traditional Paquimé ceramics in 1992. It was located in my house. We trained many people there and received support through temporary employment programs from the state government; there were also people who wanted to know about this new activity that provided for many families. Many of these persons continued with the ceramic art using as support the knowledge we had about the ancient ceramics of Paquimé. That was what I personally focused on because Mata Ortiz was evolving with contemporary designs and some of the artisans did not know much about our mother culture so I decided to focus my efforts on rescuing the ceramics with the ancient pieces and classical designs from the era of Paquimé’s splendor.

I contacted institutions in the United States and in many parts of Mexico to reinforce academic activities related to acquiring more knowledge about the ceramics of Paquimé.  In Colorado Springs, Colorado I received support to write more about the topic and I completed a large manuscript about the events that had occurred in Mata Ortiz entitled “Mata Ortiz, Town of Potters, Ceramics of Northwest Chihuahua”. Due to its large size I was unable to publish it. I continued with exchange programs with institutions in the state of Chihuahua, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas and Oklahoma in the United States; we exchanged experiences with well-known ceramists such as Gregory Wood who is an archaeo-ceramist who specializes in Anazasi ceramics from northern New Mexico and southern Colorado; we have held workshops on the production of ancient Anazasi and Paquimé ceramics for archaeologists through institutions like the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center in Cortez, Colorado and also soon with the Amerind Foundation of Dragoon Arizona, to hold new discussions on the ceramics of Paquimé during the last three decades with the participation of Mexican archaeologists and anthropologists.

In 2008 I summarized my previous manuscript into “The new Paquimé Ceramics” which I printed after trying, in vain, to get support from the government or another institution. The first edition of 2000 copies sold out and in 2009, the second edition was printed and also sold out. I hope to print a third edition in English to go on a book tour in the United States. The book sparked interest because it was written by a Mexican born in Casas Grandes who is also a ceramist which was a difference when compared to foreign publications.

I made a tour of institutions in Chihuahua, Jalisco, Mexico City, Baja California and Guanajuato; I visited universities, museums, public and private institutions to present the book, organize workshops, exhibitions, giving conferences to promote Paquimé and the Casas Grandes ceramics, especially the ones produced in J. Mata Ortiz. We sent some pieces to Europe on a traveling exhibition that began in Norway and ended in Finland.

Seventeen years ago, with the support of FONART and the state government, we organized the first Ceramic contest for the region of Paquimé that is ongoing and gives recognition to local talent and helps to support them with the sale of their pieces. There are a significant number of buyers from the United States which makes the event successful from a financial perspective and is a good pretext to get together with the locals. The name of the event was changed to Ceramic Contest of Mata Ortiz. We have supported the national ceramic contests of Talquepaque and Tonala. We encourage artisans and artists to participate with excellent results. Also, we recently promoted collective exhibitions like the Ollas Pintas at the Casa Chihuahua Museum where 20 artists participated. A year ago we also organized the 2012 Ceramist Meeting in Chihuahua City with the participation of ceramists from Guadalajara, Mexico City, Tijuana; Madrid, Spain; Chihuahua, Houston Texas and Colorado U.S.A. The next meeting is scheduled for May 2014 in Casas Grandes, Chihuahua with a much greater number of national participants.

In general, the actions of this writer may be summarized as having given support, promoting and presenting information about the Paquimé culture through its ceramics. All my efforts during these 22 years have been to get to know the material, the designs, processes and everything related to the ancient ceramics. I’ve also worked with the more modern interpretations of the art and supported new ceramists and the extraordinary contributions made by J. Mata Ortiz without forgetting that the ancient ceramists’ iconography is the way of keeping that cultural heritage alive and that it’s necessary to get to know it better. We have also tried to transmit knowledge of our mother culture to young people and have contributed to the conservation of the archaeological sites and we have registered whenever possible the knowledge we’ve acquired to share it with new generations. We have also organized activities oriented towards the academic considerations of the topic with the participation of institutions of higher learning and cultural organizations. One of our pending projects is the creation of a School of Ceramics where initially, a bachelor’s degree would be offered so that ceramists could be recognized formally for their contributions to culture and art and so that they may improve their standard of living.

It’s been a lengthy story but it finally ends. “Un abrazo”

Nuevo Casas Grandes, Chihuahua, November 27, 2013

 

 

 

Mata Ortiz History

Mata Ortiz History, Notes from Ron Goebel and Nancy Andrews

“There’s the story, then there’s the real story, then there’s the story of how the story came to be told. Then there’s what you leave out of the story. Which is part of the story too. “   Margaret Atwood

From the late 1970s: “An Odyssey Complete and Continuing” written by Spencer MacCallum. Only one potter is mentioned. MacCallum claims that the modern Mata Ortiz pottery tradition was started by one person. Research shows that this claim is false.

In 1994 Walter Parks wrote the “Miracle of Mata Ortiz..” As usual, several people helped him with his book. In Acknowledgements Parks wrote:  “…MacCallum was especially generous, opening all of his files to me and reviewing the text.” This was the first edition of the book. MacCallum reviewed the test; essentially MacCallum approved the text of the book.

Many years later a second edition of this book was published. Per Ana Livingston in the Journal of the Southwest, “Mr. Parks reprinted “The Miracle of Mata Ortiz….”

This second edition is a larger book beautifully reprinted with a stunning pot by Juan Quezada on the cover. However, there was “a complete deletion of a section by author and former village pottery trader and business owner Michael Allan Williams [Mike Williams].”

The first edition states that Parks helped to finance the hotel of Mike Williams.

The second edition of his book deletes any mention of Michael Williams. Veterans of Mata Ortiz confirm that Williams was a scandalous exploiter of children. Williams was purged from the second edition. Parks did not want to be associated with Williams. Why?

 

 

 

Jerardo Tena

Jera Penguin

Jerardo Tena effigy. Jerardo is a nephew of Felix Ortiz.

Jerardo (Jera) Tena is the nephew of Félix Ortiz. Félix and many others were pioneers of pottery in Mata Ortiz. Jera lives in Barrio Porvenir. Jera says, “When I was eight years old I collected clay and manure with my Uncle Félix. I looked at the clay and pottery while my uncle worked. That’s how I learned.”

Unlike Félix, Jera does not make blackware. He is best known for well-polished polychrome animal effigies and has won First Place award five times at the Concurso, the nationally sponsored competition of Mata Ortiz pottery.

The first photo shows penguin effigies in process from 2017. The second photo shows a sheep effigy from 2008.

They Were Written Out of Their Own History

2012-09-18 14.39.472012-09-17 15.34.52

Written Out of Their Own History

English/Espanol

All research was done in Mata Ortiz. This post is inspired by Ana Livingston’s article in the Journal of the Southwest, Winter 2016.

The first time Ana Livingston visited Mata Ortiz, Spencer MacCallum told her: the modern pottery began with one man. Then that man taught many others. Livingston thought this was “a well-fashioned traders tale” intended to market the pottery. As a student in my class at Western New Mexico University stated, “It was a marketing ploy.”

Months after talking with MacCallum, Ana was told by a laborer from Mata Ortiz: “What has been said about how the pottery began is not true. It was several people, my extended family and family friends [who started the pottery].”

MacCallum tells a story. That story is appealing in many ways. The story may help to sell the pottery. But there are a lot of problems with MacCallum’s narrative. As Livingston says, “…many of the initial potters had been written out of their own history.”

 

Omitido De Su Propia Historia

Toda la investigación se realizó en Mata Ortiz.

Esta publicación está inspirada en el artículo de Ana Livingston en el Journal of the Southwest, Invierno 2016.

La primera vez que Ana Livingston visitó a Mata Ortiz, Spencer Mac- Callum le dijo: la alfarería moderna comenzó con un solo hombre. Solamente una persona. Entonces ese hombre enseñó a muchos otros. Livingston pensó que se trataba de “un cuento de comerciantes bien diseñado” destinado a comercializar la cerámica. Como estudiante de mi clase en Western New Mexico University, declaró: “Fue una estratagema de marketing.”

Meses después de hablar con MacCallum, un trabajador de Mata Ortiz le dijo a Ana: “Lo que han dicho de como comenzó la cerámica no es verdad! Fueron varios, mis familiares y sus amigos [que comenzaron la cerámica].”

MacCallum cuenta una historia. Esa historia es atractiva de muchas maneras. La historia puede ayudar a vender la cerámica. Pero hay muchos problemas con la narrativa de MacCallum. Como dice Livingston, “… muchos de los alfareros iniciales habían escrito de [borrado] su propia historia”.

 

Sabino Villalba, son of Andres Villalba

SABINO

This pot by Sabino Villalba depicts a god of Paquimé, part man and part parrot, swimming with a parrot tucked under his arm. The crosshatching represents a shaman. The spiral is a dust devil or tornado. Great work and flawless painting. (Not for sale) Sabino is the son of well known and highly respected Andres Villalba.

Esta olla de Sabino “Caby” Villalba representa a un dios de Paquimé, parte hombre y parte guacamaya, nadando con un guacamaya escondido bajo su brazo. El cruce de rayos representa a un chamán. La espiral es un diablo de polvo o tornado. Gran trabajo y pintura impecable. Sabino es hijo del muy conocido y muy respetado Andrés Villalba.

Mata Ortiz, Anglo Influence and Omissions

According to research by Mata Ortiz expert Jim Hills of Tucson, Arizona, indeed several people in the Porvenir neighborhood were making pottery in the 1970s. Porvenir potters Rojelio Silveira, Emeterio Ortiz, Félix Ortiz and Salbador Ortiz all made Mata Ortiz pottery in the early 1970s. In his paper, “Reconstructing a Miracle” in the University of Arizona’s Journal of the Southwest, Hills states, “Spencer MacCallum continually customized his story over the years in an attempt to promote a single narrative, which required omitting, modifying or diluting facts.” The Ortiz and Silveira potters were among those omissions.  Thus, according to Hills, “a blend of well-meaning entrepreneurial strategies, reticence, forgetfulness, imagination, exaggeration and romantic notions of reality have shaped the Mata Ortiz narrative.” Essentially, two U.S. writers shaped an incomplete history of the Mata Ortiz pottery tradition. In 1993 American Walter Parks wrote a book based on MacCallum’s notes. In the book’s acknowledgements, Parks states, “Spencer MacCallum was especially generous, opening all of his files to me and reviewing the text.”

Based on new voices and evidence, that history is deficient. It tells only part of the story. Many significant families were excluded from their writings.

THE PIONEERS, MANUEL OLIVAS

DVD COVER“Efforts Made to Rescue the Ceramics of Paquime” by

Julián Alejandro Hernández Chávez

 

“In 1952, in Casas Grandes, Manuel Olivas began to produce low temperature ceramics decorated with the designs from the pieces found at the archaeological sites. His grandmother taught him how to find the clay deposits, how to prepare the clay and fire his pieces the way his family did to produce clay articles. This is how the new traditional Paquimé ceramics were born; after this, the ceramics appeared spontaneously in several communities in the region and the new potters exchanged the information they had. They sold their pieces as utilitarian and decorative objects, first to locals and later to tourists. There was a flurry of activity at the beginning of the seventies [1970s] which was centered on the town of Juan Mata Ortiz where Juan Quezada, Félix Ortiz, Rogelio Silviera and others worked full time as potters.”

Julián Alejandro Hernández of Nuevo Casas Grandes is a preeminent pottery expert focusing on the Casas Grandes and Mata Ortiz pottery traditions. Mr. Hernández has written two books about the art and archaeological ruins of Paquime in Casas Grandes, Chihuahua, Mexico. He is a working potter, having taught dozens of people about pottery. Hernandez started the first pottery school in Nuevo Casas Grandes. In addition, he is the director of the Francisco Villa Preparatory School.

 

 

MATA ORTIZ, PABLA TALAVERA QUEZADA

ENGLISH/ESPANOL

Pabla is the daughter of Rito Talavera and Lydia Quezada. Pabla made this pot a few years ago. She made about three or four like this. The tiles are attached to the pot before firing. Since Pabla and her family live about four hours from Rito and Lydia, she transported this piece to them before firing.

This post is solely to show great work; this is not for sale. Enjoy!

PABLA BLOG

Pabla es la hija de Rito Talavera y Lydia Quezada. Pabla hizo esta olla hace unos años. Hizo unos tres o cuatro como éste. Los azulejos se unen a la olla antes de quemar. Puesto que Pabla y su familia viven cerca de cuatro horas de Rito y de Lydia, ella transportó esta pieza a ellos antes de encender.

Este post es solo para mostrar un gran trabajo. Esto no está a la venta. Disfrutar!